Tag: CulturePage 1 of 32

The Spring a Time for Calving and Cleaving

Gwynfryn Thomas , January 17th, 2022


This poem was partly inspired by my first foray into the world of Sámi reindeer herding back in 2013. In this new year of 2022, I’ve been reflecting…


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When Anthropology Meets the Graphic Novel in Thailand

Claudio Sopranzetti, Sara Fabbri, and Chiara Natalucci , January 11th, 2022


The graphic novel The King of Bangkok follows the story of Nok, a blind man who makes his living selling lottery tickets on the streets of Bangkok. Claudio…


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Five New Year’s Rituals of Renewal

Dimitris Xygalatas , January 3rd, 2022


In Auckland, New Zealand, Māori people celebrate the rising of Mataraki, also known as the Pleiades star cluster, as the start of the new year in July. Hannah…


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Head of a Maiden

Caroline Giles Banks , December 10th, 2021


My poem “Head of a Maiden” is my response to the recent New York Times article “Looking for a Stolen Idol? Visit the Museum of the Manhattan D.A.”…


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When Carbon Credits Drive People From Their Homes

Blanca Begert , December 9th, 2021


A sign inside the Alto Mayo Protected Forest promotes “conservation agreements that change lives,” including ecotourism and sustainable coffee. Blanca Begert The Mayo River begins in the …


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The Emotional Logic of a Black Poetics: Truth, Metaphor, Beauty, Joy

Daniel Salas , December 9th, 2021


In this free live event, Poetry Editor Christine Weeber and SAPIENS Public Anthropology Fellow Eshe Lewis will speak with Justin D. Wright, a doctoral student in sociocultural anthropology…


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The Age of Digital Divination

Matthew Gwynfryn Thomas , December 7th, 2021


Divination rituals around the world often include animals, as seen in this early 20th-century painting of fortunetelling using a chicken by Russian artist Konstantin Makovsky. Brandmeister/Wi…


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What Netflix Got Wrong About Indigenous Storytelling

Andrea Malaya M. Ragragio and Myfel D. Paluga , December 1st, 2021


An Indigenous Pantaron Manobo man sports a pendant necklace imbued with sacred power. Andrea Malaya M. Ragragio Within days of its release last June, the Netflix animated series…


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I Carry My Grief With Me, but I Also Carry My Joy

Justin D. Wright , November 26th, 2021


When you lose someone the future dies. Or, at least, the one with them, that you thought about with them, in it. I imagine any relationship that ends…


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Do Things Have to Be This Way?

David Graeber and David Wengrow , November 24th, 2021


[no-caption] Henrik Sorensen/Getty Images Excerpted from The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity. © 2021 by David Graeber and David Wengrow. Reprinted with permission from Farra…


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Lessons We Learn

Jason Vasser-Elong , November 19th, 2021


“Lessons We Learn” is part of the collection Lead Me to Life: Voices of the African Diaspora. Read the introduction to the collection here. The past flashes like…


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What Industrial Societies Get Wrong About Childhood

Karen L. Kramer , November 18th, 2021


[no-caption] ER Productions Limited Each year across the world, kids of roughly the same age are packed into classrooms and confined to desks with the intent of learning…


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Surfing in Color

Traben Pleasant , November 12th, 2021


“Surfing in Color” is part of the collection Lead Me to Life: Voices of the African Diaspora. Read the introduction to the collection here. Floating, my gaze and…


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On Chicken Soup and Justice

foodanthro , November 12th, 2021


The author’s matzoh ball soup. Photo courtesy of the author, all rights reserved. Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of postings by students in a graduate…


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The Sisters of Loretto Share a Kinship With the Earth

Jeffrey Shenton , November 11th, 2021


The Sisters of Loretto, a women’s religious community, prioritize environmental stewardship at their working farm in rural Kentucky. Cody Rakes This month, global delegates have been gath…


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Mourning Kin After the End of Cannibalism

Aparecida Vilaça , November 9th, 2021


Clockwise from top left: (1) Indigenous Wari’ dwellings in Amazonia, Brazil. (2) The author (middle) with her adopted father, Paletó (right), in 2012. (3) The author interviewing Wari’…


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“Of Peccaries and People: Perception and Politics in the Texas Hill Country” RAI Anthropology and Conservation Conference Talk 2021

Anthropology365 , November 5th, 2021


On October 27, I presented some of my preliminary research at the Royal Anthropological Institute’s 2021 Anthropology and Conservation conference at the “Living with Diversity in a More-t…


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Riot

Dina Rivera , November 5th, 2021


“The Voice of Diaspora” is part of the collection Lead Me to Life: Voices of the African Diaspora. Read the introduction to the collection here. Her arm is…


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We All Live on Permafrost

Susan Alexandra Crate , November 2nd, 2021


Indigenous Sakha communities in Siberia raise a rare native horse breed that can survive the extreme cold. Susan Alexandra Crate One of the most distinct memories from my…


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The Voice of Diaspora

Lara de Paula Passos , October 29th, 2021


“The Voice of Diaspora” is part of the collection Lead Me to Life: Voices of the African Diaspora. Read the introduction to the collection here.   I wake…


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How People Actually Use Their Smartphones

Laura Haapio-Kirk and Georgiana Murariu , October 28th, 2021


[no-caption] John Cei Douglas In 2022, the smartphone, first introduced by IBM, will celebrate its 30th birthday. Most of us now use a smartphone every day—whether we like…


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Adapt or Abandon? Hard Choices in the Himalayas

T.V. Padma , October 27th, 2021


The Loba tribespeople living in the village of Dhe in Nepal are increasingly abandoning their homes as climate change transforms the landscape. Taylor Weidman/LightRocket/Getty Images On …


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Window

Jason Vasser-Elong , October 22nd, 2021


“Window” is part of the collection Lead Me to Life: Voices of the African Diaspora. Read the introduction to the collection here.   I. Finding myself lost in…


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Preserving Black Women’s Stories as a Labor of Love

Eshe Lewis , October 21st, 2021


Irma McClaurin holds up her first book, Women of Belize: Gender and Change in Central America. Ray Carson/University of Florida Photographic Services, 1996. Used with permission of University…


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