Tag: Extraction

Dredging for Common Ground: Geosocial Politics of Depth at Industrial Coastal Chennai

colinhoag , April 21st, 2022


Editorial Note: This post is part of our series highlighting the work of the Anthropology and Environment Society’s 2021 Roy A. Rappaport Prize Finalists. We asked them to outline the…


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Confronting Legacies of Toxic Goodness: Speculative Reflections from the 4S 2021 Annual Meeting

Jessica Caporusso , December 7th, 2021


This piece was originally posted on November 24, 2021 on the EnviroSociety blog here. To cite, please use the following: Caporusso, Jessica, Duygu Kaşdoğan, and Katie Ulrich. 2021….


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Harnessing Indeterminacy: The Technopolitics of Hydrocarbon Prospects

Zeynep Oguz , July 20th, 2021


A drillship in the sea. Resource: Unsplash. Amidst an international crisis sparked by the scandalous confessions of a mafia boss and a pollution and climate change-triggered marine disaster…


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Science and Justice: “Impartial” Water Monitoring and Resistance to the Escobal Mine in Guatemala

Nicholas Copeland , July 7th, 2020


Editor’s note: This is the third post in an ongoing series called “The Spectrum of Research and Practice in Guatemalan Science Studies.” The surface installation of the Escobal…


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Dear Graduate Student…

Chelsea Horton , November 6th, 2019


Dear Graduate Student, Here we are, well into another semester. Many of you are in the field already or preparing for the field. If you are already there,…


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Bodies of Flesh and Ore: Geosocial Formation of Miners and Metal in Highland Bolivia

colinhoag , February 26th, 2019


Editorial Note: This post is part of our series highlighting the work of the Anthropology and Environment Society’s 2018 Roy A. Rappaport Prize Finalists. We asked them to outline the…


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The Sacrifice Zones of American “Energy Independence”: Pipeline and Refinery Expansion in the Chicago Region

therezamiller , August 16th, 2018


By Graham Pickren, Roosevelt University § The United States is seemingly on its way to “energy independence.” Since the oil price increases and gas lines of the 1970s shocked…


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Processing Settler Toxicities: Part I

Anne Spice , June 16th, 2018


This 2+ part post is adapted from a presentation at the 2018 Cultures of Energy Symposium at Rice University. Many thanks to everyone who responded to my call…


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Commentary: Toxic Bodies, Part II

colinhoag , May 8th, 2018


By Kristina Lyons, University of California, Santa Cruz § The president of the communal action committee whom I call Doña Marta ushered me to a more secluded corner behind…


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Commentary: Toxic Bodies, Part I

colinhoag , February 22nd, 2018


By Mónica Salas Landa, Lafayette College § Oil infrastructure, Poza Rica, Veracruz, Mexico. Image by author. ‘‘How do you feel living right across from the oil and gas complex?’’ I…


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Reclaiming Nature? Indigenous Homeland and Oil Sands Territory

Chitra , March 7th, 2017


Tara Joly, University of Aberdeen § Settler colonial relations construct the Athabasca region as extractive oil sands territory, yet the region remains homeland for Indigenous peoples, including Méti…


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