Tag: New Books in Technology

Lee Humphreys, “The Qualified Self: Social Media and the Accounting of Everyday Life” (MIT Press, 2018)

Jasmine McNealy , October 19th, 2018


Physical journals, scrapbooks, and photo albums all offer their owners the opportunity to chronicle both mundane and extravagant events. But unlike social media posting, this analog memorializing of…


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Christopher J. Lee, “Jet Lag” (Bloomsbury Academic, 2017)

Eric Lemay , February 27th, 2018


My father has this personality quirk that drives me crazy. Whenever and wherever he travels, no matter how far, he refuses to reset his watch to the local…


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Leo Coleman, “A Moral Technology: Electrification as Political Ritual in New Delhi” (Cornell UP, 2017)

Madhuri Karak , January 19th, 2018


We take electricity for granted. But the material grids and wires that bring light to homes and connect places are also objects of moral concern, political freedoms and…


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Zek Valkyrie, “Game Worlds Get Real: How Who We Are Online Became Who We Are Offline” (Praeger, 2017)

Jared Miracle , December 15th, 2017


Zek Valkyrie teaches at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs. His new book, Game Worlds Get Real: How Who We Are Online Became Who We Are Offline…


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Sophia Roosth, “Synthetic: How Life Got Made” (U Chicago Press, 2017)

Carla Nappi , May 13th, 2017


Sophia Roosth‘s wonderful new book follows researchers clustered around MIT beginning in 2003 who named themselves synthetic biologists. A historically informed anthropological analysis based on… Visit New Books…


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Phillip Penix-Tadsen, “Cultural Code: Video Games and Latin America” (MIT Press, 2016)

Jasmine McNealy , March 14th, 2016


Symbols have meanings that change depending upon the cultural context. But how do we discuss symbols, their meanings, and their cultural contexts without an adequate vocabulary? Phillip Penix-Tadsen, ……


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Dominic Pettman, “Human Error” (UMinnesota, 2011)/”Look at the Bunny” (Zero Books, 2013)

Marshall Poe , May 31st, 2013


“The humans are dead.” Whether or not you recognize the epigram from Flight of the Conchords (and if not, there are worse ways to spend a few minutes…


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