Author: Krystal D'CostaPage 1 of 5

How Do Leaders Impact Our Definition of Responsibility?

Krystal D'Costa , April 8th, 2019


What happens when our sense of responsibility breaks down? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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It’s True: We’re Probably All a Little Irish–Especially in the Caribbean

Krystal D'Costa , March 17th, 2019


Everyone is supposedly a little Irish on St. Patrick’s Day but there is more truth to this saying than most recognize. It’s not merely a loophole allowing for…


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Chocolate Treats Have Been a Part of Our History for at Least 5,000 Years

Krystal D'Costa , October 31st, 2018


Not a trick: We’ve been hooked on chocolate treats for a long time. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Most Initial Conversations Go Better Than People Think

Krystal D'Costa , October 17th, 2018


We’re largely overestimating how much our feelings are on display to others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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The Impact of Politics on Workplace Productivity

Krystal D'Costa , October 15th, 2018


The always-on media cycle means political news is at our fingertips. What does this mean for employers? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Who are the Indigenous People that Columbus Met?

Krystal D'Costa , October 12th, 2018


Peaceful and warring—where does the truth lie about the Indigenous people of the Caribbean? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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“Whose Land Do You Live On?” Reminds Americans Colonization Happened in Their Backyards

Krystal D'Costa , October 10th, 2018


First Peoples populated America long before Europeans arrived to stake their claim. We have largely forgotten this legacy. A mapping tool is looking to change that — Read…


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On Indigenous People’s Day, the Fight for Bears Ears Remained Unresolved

Krystal D'Costa , October 8th, 2018


Since Theodore Roosevelt all but four presidents—Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and George H.W. Bush—have used the Antiquities Act to enlarge or dedicate new national… — Re…


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What Makes the Human Foot Unique?

Krystal D'Costa , October 3rd, 2018


Adding a chapter in the story of what makes us human. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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What Drives Our Quest for the Perfect Instagram Picture?

Krystal D'Costa , September 26th, 2018


Instagram is a social mirror for more than just selfies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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73,000-Year-Old Hashtag Is Oldest Example of Abstract Art

Krystal D'Costa , September 12th, 2018


A silica flake from Blombos Cave contains the oldest example of prehistoric abstract art, and it looks like one of the most used symbols online — Read more on…


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What Are the Jobs That Immigrants Do?

Krystal D'Costa , August 9th, 2018


“The data reveals an important point: There is no singular industry or job where unauthorized immigrant workers are a majority. They are outnumbered by native-born workers when you…


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Why Do People Want to Drink the Sarcophagus Water?

Krystal D'Costa , July 25th, 2018


This is a snapshot of who we are right at this moment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Our 14,400-Year-Old Relationship with Bread

Krystal D'Costa , July 24th, 2018


New evidence from Jordan is challenging what we thought we knew about hunter–gatherer diets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Resisting the Depersonalization of the Work Space

Krystal D'Costa , July 18th, 2018


No one likes a bare desk, least of all the people who have to sit there — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Hominins Likely Left Africa Earlier Than Believed

Krystal D'Costa , July 12th, 2018


Our ancestors may have been on the move out of Africa 300,000 years earlier than we originally thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Getting to the Bottom of Hanger

Krystal D'Costa , June 27th, 2018


It turns out there is truth in the idea that when you’re hungry, you just aren’t yourself. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Why is Cooperation So Difficult in the Workplace?

Krystal D'Costa , April 29th, 2018


Cooperation may be central to our social evolution but American cultural emphasis on the individual and her successes creates a contradiction. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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What the Cottingley Fairies can Teach Us About Belief

Krystal D'Costa , April 17th, 2018


Why do false beliefs persist in the face of facts? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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The Legacy of the Trickster Hare

Krystal D'Costa , April 1st, 2018


Let’s consider a different view of the Easter bunny. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Why did we give our data to Facebook in the first place?

Krystal D'Costa , March 28th, 2018


Photos of our children, favorite movies, milestone photos, check-ins. Why do we take better care of our house keys than our personal data? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Our Understanding of the Labor Experience Is Overdue for Change

Krystal D'Costa , January 17th, 2018


Labor interventions are largely driven by standards set in the 1950s. A growing body of research suggests it may be time for a change — Read more on…


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How to Make a Monster: Lessons from the Ancient Greeks

Krystal D'Costa , October 31st, 2017


Homer’s Odyssey is essentially a monster-making manual. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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How did purple become a Halloween color?

Krystal D'Costa , October 30th, 2017


Orange, yellow, brown, red and black make sense. Where did purple come from? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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