Author: Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in PracticePage 1 of 2

Ancient Girl Had Denisovan and Neandertal Parents

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , September 6th, 2018


The history of modern humans is deeply embedded with the history of other hominid groups. Our understanding of these connections is only just beginning to unfold — Read…


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Why do we share viral videos?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , April 13th, 2016


Why have cats taken over the Internet? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Why is the “Tears of Joy” emoji everywhere?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , February 12th, 2016


While it doesn’t quite seem that we’re ready to chat in all emojis and only emojis, they are serving to modify our responses and add meaning in an…


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Using attachment theory to understand Facebook stalking

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , December 15th, 2015


Social media has made digital voyeurism the norm, but some of us are more inclined to pursue online surveillance than others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Our language of refusal reveals a shifting stance on prejudice

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , November 22nd, 2015


The ways in which we’re speaking out against Syrian refugees indicates that we are redefining prejudicial discourse. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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What do those temporary Facebook profile pictures really mean?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , November 18th, 2015


We know that online peer pressure is powerful. But what we don’t know is whether that pressure is driving real change.  — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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We’ve Modified Our Behavior So We Can Text and Walk

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , July 29th, 2015


  We may be driving technology to respond to our needs in various areas, but this is one instance where we’ve definitely demonstrated that we’re also adapting to…


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How Do We Normalize Pregnancy?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , July 29th, 2015


Is our cultural antipathy toward pregnancy and children creating a health hazard? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Why does everything look the same?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , July 16th, 2015


Wooden floors. Open concept. Giant kitchen islands. Marble countertops. Large windows. High ceilings. Walk-in closets. Space for entertaining. Stainless steel appliances. These are some of the… — …


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How Information Builds a Community

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , June 26th, 2015


Social media has changed the way we access and process local news. It empowers individuals to share what they know, which can be both good and bad as…


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Context Matters When It Comes to Travel Time

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , June 12th, 2015


People will often feel that the return trip covering the same geographical distance requires less time to complete. It doesn’t. When all factors are equalized–same distance, traveling… —…


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A Story of Wood

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , June 5th, 2015


Wood has played an important role in the history of civilization. Humans have used it for fuel, building materials, furniture, paper, tools, weapons, and more. And demand for…


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Rice and Beans: Shaping the Customer’s Choice

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , May 15th, 2015


As more cultural commodities enter the market, cultural distinctions will become muted to suit the appetites of a wider clientele — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Rice and Beans: The Private Role of Food

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , May 14th, 2015


The signfiicance of selling a personal substance in the public market. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Rice and Beans: What Is the Difference Between Private and Public Culture?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , May 12th, 2015


About Rice and Beans: Following recent discussions on food here on Anthropology in Practice, this week I’ll feature a four part series that that explores the ways immigrant…


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Rice and Beans: How Does Culture Become Generic?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , May 11th, 2015


About Rice and Beans: Following recent discussions on food here on Anthropology in Practice, this week I’ll feature a four part series that explores the ways immigrant groups…


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Identity and Meaning in Derby Hats

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , May 8th, 2015


Last Saturday over 170,000 people descended on Churchill Downs for the 141st Kentucky Derby. The Derby is the first of three races that comprise the American Triple Crown…


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Can Hunter-Gatherer Societies Teach Us About Cooperation?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , May 1st, 2015


We’re big on teaching cooperative practices, even while we encourage competition. Humans are the only species to cooperate to the degree that we do, and this cooperation may…


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Culture Bites: The Changing Nature of the Food Truck Industry

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , April 24th, 2015


What do you normally have for lunch? Leftovers? A sandwich? Do you bring it from home or do you buy it from a local eatery? In New York…


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Is there more to locking up than personal safety?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , April 17th, 2015


Do you lock the door to your home when you’re inside during the day? Or do you leave the door open if you are just running out for…


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Then and Now: April Fools’ Day—How did we get here?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , April 2nd, 2015


Where is here exactly? Here is a tired, eye-roll inducing pseudo-holiday that we endure with a grimace every year. Hopefully you have room for one more article about…


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Can anthropology defeat self-deception to build better apps?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , March 30th, 2015


Last September, I participated in the relaunch of Ignite NYC. These mini-presentations test your game by only allowing you five minutes and 20 slides to share your idea…


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Is email one of the last private spaces online?

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , March 30th, 2015


Someone has been using my email address. First, she registered it as the recovery address for another account she created, so I was notified about that account. —…


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It’s True: We’re Probably All a Little Irish—Especially in the Caribbean

Scientific American Blog: Anthropology in Practice , March 17th, 2015


In the United States, it’s St. Patrick’s Day. This Irish national holiday celebrates Saint Patrick who is—potentially—the most recognizable of Irish saints, known for… — Re…


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