Tag: ethnobotanyPage 2 of 2

Agony and Ecstasy in the Amazon: Excerpt from ‘Broad Street’

Glenn H. Shepard , June 30th, 2015


Never tell a Matsigenka shaman his tobacco snuff is anything but katsi, “extremely painful.” I learned this lesson the way I learned most of my lessons during fieldwork…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Agony and Ecstasy in the Amazon: Excerpt from ‘Broad Street’

Glenn H. Shepard , June 30th, 2015


Never tell a Matsigenka shaman his tobacco snuff is anything but katsi, “extremely painful.” I learned this lesson the way I learned most of my lessons during fieldwork…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

‘Remarkable Plants’ by Bynum & Bynum, ‘The History of Central Asia’ by Baumer

A. J. West , November 25th, 2014


It was my birthday last week, so I've got some new books to read, including volume two of Christoph Baumer's The History of Central Asia (I B Tauris),…


→West's Meditations

The Kopenawa Galaxy: Review of ‘The Falling Sky’ by Davi Kopenawa and Bruce Albert

Glenn H. Shepard , October 17th, 2014


To look across a Yanomami village on a clear night is like seeing the universe in a mirror. Above, the stars glisten like living eyes, their vision unimpeded…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

The Kopenawa Galaxy: Review of ‘The Falling Sky’ by Davi Kopenawa and Bruce Albert

Glenn H. Shepard , October 17th, 2014


To look across a Yanomami village on a clear night is like seeing the universe in a mirror. Above, the stars glisten like living eyes, their vision unimpeded…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

The Kopenawa Galaxy: Review of ‘The Falling Sky’ by Davi Kopenawa and Bruce Albert

Glenn H. Shepard , October 17th, 2014


To look across a Yanomami village on a clear night is like seeing the universe in a mirror. Above, the stars glisten like living eyes, their vision unimpeded…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

The Kopenawa Galaxy: Review of ‘The Falling Sky’ by Davi Kopenawa and Bruce Albert

Glenn H. Shepard , October 17th, 2014


To look across a Yanomami village on a clear night is like seeing the universe in a mirror. Above, the stars glisten like living eyes, their vision unimpeded…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Gift of the Spider Woman: Spinning, weaving and womanhood among the Matsigenka of Peru

Glenn H. Shepard , February 24th, 2014


The moon is bright, the night is giddy with festivities and Shanuiva has emerged from her cage. Jaula, literally "cage," is how Spanish-speaking Matsigenka refer to the palm…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Gift of the Spider Woman: Spinning, weaving and womanhood among the Matsigenka of Peru

Glenn H. Shepard , February 24th, 2014


The moon is bright, the night is giddy with festivities and Shanuiva has emerged from her cage. Jaula, literally "cage," is how Spanish-speaking Matsigenka refer to the palm…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Gift of the Spider Woman: Spinning, weaving and womanhood among the Matsigenka of Peru

Glenn H. Shepard , February 24th, 2014


The moon is bright, the night is giddy with festivities and Shanuiva has emerged from her cage. Jaula, literally "cage," is how Spanish-speaking Matsigenka refer to the palm…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Gift of the Spider Woman: Spinning, weaving and womanhood among the Matsigenka of Peru

Glenn H. Shepard , February 24th, 2014


The moon is bright, the night is giddy with festivities and Shanuiva has emerged from her cage. Jaula, literally "cage," is how Spanish-speaking Matsigenka refer to the palm…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Why I Sometimes Wish I Were an Armchair Anthropologist

Glenn H. Shepard , December 6th, 2013


No figure in the discipline is more despised than that smug Victorian fixture, the Armchair Anthropologist. The best antidote for this regrettable legacy is Fieldwork, philosopher’s stone of…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Why I Sometimes Wish I Were an Armchair Anthropologist

Glenn H. Shepard , December 6th, 2013


No figure in the discipline is more despised than that smug Victorian fixture, the Armchair Anthropologist. The best antidote for this regrettable legacy is Fieldwork, philosopher’s stone of…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Why I Sometimes Wish I Were an Armchair Anthropologist

Glenn H. Shepard , December 6th, 2013


No figure in the discipline is more despised than that smug Victorian fixture, the Armchair Anthropologist. The best antidote for this regrettable legacy is Fieldwork, philosopher’s stone of…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Why I Sometimes Wish I Were an Armchair Anthropologist

Glenn H. Shepard , December 6th, 2013


No figure in the discipline is more despised than that smug Victorian fixture, the Armchair Anthropologist. The best antidote for this regrettable legacy is Fieldwork, philosopher’s stone of…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

The Cheerful Pessimist: A shaman’s farewell to Mariano Vicente Kicha

Glenn H. Shepard , October 3rd, 2013


“Ariota pairani…” ‘And so it was long ago…’With those simple words in his rich, sonorous voice, Mariano began each one of the dozens of myths, folk tales and…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

The Cheerful Pessimist: A shaman’s farewell to Mariano Vicente Kicha

Glenn H. Shepard , October 3rd, 2013


“Ariota pairani…” ‘And so it was long ago…’With those simple words in his rich, sonorous voice, Mariano began each one of the dozens of myths, folk tales and…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

The Cheerful Pessimist: A shaman’s farewell to Mariano Vicente Kicha

Glenn H. Shepard , October 3rd, 2013


“Ariota pairani…” ‘And so it was long ago…’With those simple words in his rich, sonorous voice, Mariano began each one of the dozens of myths, folk tales and…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Remembering Francis Bossuyt

Glenn H. Shepard , April 28th, 2013


The evening before his 31st birthday, biologist Francis Bossuyt went for his daily swim in the lake at Cocha Cashu Biological Station in Manu Park, Peru, and was…


→Notes from the Ethnoground

Three Cheers for Periwinkle: Ethnobotany, histiocytosis and Rare Disease Day

Glenn H. Shepard , February 27th, 2013


Just over seven years ago, my youngest son, then eighteen months old, woke up one morning with a lump exactly the size and shape of an olive behind…


→Notes from the Ethnoground