Tag: IndigenousPage 2 of 9

SAPIENS Podcast Season 4 Reflections and Celebrations

In this live event, a panel of archaeologists and podcasters celebrates the completion of SAPIENS Podcast Season 4 and RadioCIAMS’ SAPIENS Talk Back series. Meet the amazing people…

The Yaghan Rise Again

Archaeologist Atilio Francisco Zangrando, foreground, has excavated along the Beagle Channel, or Onashaga in the Yaghan language, since 1998. Katrina Pyne This article was originally publ…

Rituals to help us out, and beliefs one professes tongue in cheek – Part II

By Ton Salman This is part II of the blog “Rituals to help us out….” If you have not yet read part I, you can read it here….

What Ancient DNA Reveals About Life in Africa 20,000 Years Ago

Kondoa Irangi rock art in present-day Tanzania features the cultural expressions of hunter-gatherers and pastoralists over a 2,000-year span. Nina R/Wikimedia Commons This article was ori…

More Than a Mountain

The sky island of Dzil Nchaa Si’an is more than a mountain. It is a significant landmark in Arizona for Apache tribal members to collect medicinal plants, perform…

Revealing an Ice Age Route for Indigenous Peoples

Research at British Columbia’s Topknot Lake and Little Woss Lake shows what the environment might have been like during the last ice age. Shanna Baker This article was…

Curating as Caretaking

History is taught in all kinds of ways—through textbooks, movies, and … museums. In this episode, museum curators challenge the status quo and connect their ancestry to advance…

“Cowboys and Indians”—When Dirt Rocks Are Dynamite

The Lone Ranger and Tonto. Silver Screen Collection/Archive Photos/Getty Images “With his faithful Indian companion Tonto, the daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains led the fi…

At the Heart of It All

For its practitioners, archaeology can feel like it is unearthing events deep in the past … until it doesn’t. What is the experience of researchers who discover their…

A Genetic Chronicle of the First Peoples in the Americas

Beringia National Park in present-day Russia is part of what was once a vast refuge that allowed ancestors of Native Americans to cross into North America and survive…

How “Wilderness” Was Invented Without Indigenous Peoples

Anthropologist Spencer Greening, a member of the Gitga’at First Nation, maps 2,000-year-old fish traps in an intertidal area as part of his graduate studies in Indigenous resource management…

Consumer Culture Won’t Lead to Body Positivity

Focusing on what bodies can do shifts attention away from cultural lenses that focus on how bodies look. Holly Falconer/Getty Images I have an 8-year-old daughter. From time…

A Hidden Figure in North American Archaeology

As a historian of science, I am interested in determining who gets credit for scientific discoveries and why. Sadly, credit often goes to the powerful and connected, not…

The Spring a Time for Calving and Cleaving

This poem was partly inspired by my first foray into the world of Sámi reindeer herding back in 2013. In this new year of 2022, I’ve been reflecting…

You Won’t Survive the Apocalypse Alone

Cooperation and kindness are key qualities necessary for surviving disasters, as demonstrated by the volunteers who distributed donated supplies after Superstorm Sandy hit New York City. Robe…

Does DNA Simplify or Complicate Repatriation Claims?

University of Cape Town archaeologist Simon Hall leads a visit to the farm in Sutherland, South Africa, from which the remains of several individuals were taken a century…

What Netflix Got Wrong About Indigenous Storytelling

An Indigenous Pantaron Manobo man sports a pendant necklace imbued with sacred power. Andrea Malaya M. Ragragio Within days of its release last June, the Netflix animated series…

The black jaguar and the guardian of the forest

By Maycon Melo and Barbara Arisi In Brazil, a group of hunters killed a black jaguar. Not satisfied with the crime of killing an endangered animal, they made a video…

Five Ways Native American Communities Honor Turkeys

Ancient Indigenous peoples who lived in what is today the U.S. Southwest carved turkey bones into flutes, such as these from the site of Pecos Pueblo in New…

What Industrial Societies Get Wrong About Childhood

[no-caption] ER Productions Limited Each year across the world, kids of roughly the same age are packed into classrooms and confined to desks with the intent of learning…

Repatriation Has Transformed, Not Ended, Research

“Wheel,” by the Cheyenne-Arapaho artist Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds is situated outside the Denver Art Museum. The artwork evokes Indigenous peoples’ efforts to counter…

Mourning Kin After the End of Cannibalism

Clockwise from top left: (1) Indigenous Wari’ dwellings in Amazonia, Brazil. (2) The author (middle) with her adopted father, Paletó (right), in 2012. (3) The author interviewing Wari’…

Five Breakthrough Signs of Early Peoples in the Americas

A lot of ink has been spilled in archaeological debates about the human occupation of the continents known today as North and South America. When did people arrive?…

We All Live on Permafrost

Indigenous Sakha communities in Siberia raise a rare native horse breed that can survive the extreme cold. Susan Alexandra Crate One of the most distinct memories from my…