Tag: MindPage 2 of 5

Stone Age Myths We’ve Made Up

Stephen E. Nash , July 19th, 2019


When most members of the general public think of the Stone Age, they probably envision an adult male hominin wielding a stone tool. That picture is laughably incomplete….


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New Hominin Shakes the Family Tree—Again

John Hawks , April 10th, 2019


Homo luzonensis’ teeth are unusual in that the premolars (two teeth on the left) are relatively large, while the molars (three on the right) are smaller than other…


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How Do Leaders Impact Our Definition of Responsibility?

Krystal D'Costa , April 8th, 2019


What happens when our sense of responsibility breaks down? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Where Do “New” Languages Come From?

Elizabeth Svoboda , February 6th, 2019


As part of the Enduring Voices project, Abamu Degio (left) listens to a recording of herself singing a traditional Koro song, with linguist David Harrison (right). Jeremy Fahringer,…


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Would Our Early Ancestors Have Watched the Super Bowl?

Christopher D. Lynn , January 31st, 2019


[no-caption] Nigel Renny/Flickr “It’s not your fault you watch football all day—man has always been captivated by watching stuff,” states a Coke Zero commercial that aired during the…


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Sewing Needles Reveal the Roots of Fashion

Jacob Pagano , January 25th, 2019


[no-caption] F. d’Errico/L. Doyon The Inya River in southwestern Siberia winds through a landscape of striking seasonal changes. In the summer, crystal clear waters lap below alpine forests….


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The Science of Human Nature Has a Serious Problem

Daniel Hruschka , January 15th, 2019


[no-caption] Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images This article originally appeared on The Conversation and has been republished under Creative Commons. Over the last century, behavioral researchers have reveal…


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Most Initial Conversations Go Better Than People Think

Krystal D'Costa , October 17th, 2018


We’re largely overestimating how much our feelings are on display to others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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The Impact of Politics on Workplace Productivity

Krystal D'Costa , October 15th, 2018


The always-on media cycle means political news is at our fingertips. What does this mean for employers? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Art, neuroscience and ethnography

elliott , October 2nd, 2018


Neuroscience The brain is a wild and wonderful thing. Even in a damaged, broken, or diseased state, it performs wonders. Oliver Sacks, neurologist and prolific writer, knew this…


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What Drives Our Quest for the Perfect Instagram Picture?

Krystal D'Costa , September 26th, 2018


Instagram is a social mirror for more than just selfies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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The Rise of Emotional Robots

SAPIENS , August 28th, 2018


[no-caption] David Williams/SAPIENS Listen to the companion episode of SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human! When Dan White first pulled Pepper out of the box, it was slumped…


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Is Robot Empathy a Trap?

Daniel Salas , August 28th, 2018


[no-caption] David Williams/SAPIENS Can robots care? And why should we care if they do? SAPIENS host Jen Shannon meets Pepper the robot, and host Chip Colwell goes on…


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What Are the Jobs That Immigrants Do?

Krystal D'Costa , August 9th, 2018


“The data reveals an important point: There is no singular industry or job where unauthorized immigrant workers are a majority. They are outnumbered by native-born workers when you…


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Why Do People Want to Drink the Sarcophagus Water?

Krystal D'Costa , July 25th, 2018


This is a snapshot of who we are right at this moment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Resisting the Depersonalization of the Work Space

Krystal D'Costa , July 18th, 2018


No one likes a bare desk, least of all the people who have to sit there — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Can Child Sex Offenders Be Rehabilitated?

John Borneman , June 29th, 2018


Dexter, the protagonist of a TV series by the same name, commits horrific acts of murder—but he does not sexually abuse children, which seems to make him less…


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Getting to the Bottom of Hanger

Krystal D'Costa , June 27th, 2018


It turns out there is truth in the idea that when you’re hungry, you just aren’t yourself. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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The Age of Cultured Machines

Matthew Gwynfryn Thomas and Djuke Veldhuis , June 26th, 2018


Two robots traverse the desert floor. Explosions from a decades-old conflict have left a pockmarked and unstable territory, though many more improvised bombs lie concealed in its vast…


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It’s Official: Neanderthals Created Art

Chris Standish and Alistair Pike , May 22nd, 2018


Neanderthal art. P. Saura This article was originally published at The Conversation and has been republished under Creative Commons. What makes us human? A lot of people would argue it…


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Is Cyclical Time the Cure to Technology’s Ills?

Stephen E. Nash , May 11th, 2018


The world changed dramatically on June 29, 2007. That’s the day when the iPhone first became available to the public. In the 11 years since, more than 8.5…


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Why is Cooperation So Difficult in the Workplace?

Krystal D'Costa , April 29th, 2018


Cooperation may be central to our social evolution but American cultural emphasis on the individual and her successes creates a contradiction. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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What the Cottingley Fairies can Teach Us About Belief

Krystal D'Costa , April 17th, 2018


Why do false beliefs persist in the face of facts? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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Why did we give our data to Facebook in the first place?

Krystal D'Costa , March 28th, 2018


Photos of our children, favorite movies, milestone photos, check-ins. Why do we take better care of our house keys than our personal data? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com


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